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Unvoiced: Feminism, BDSM love stories, Gothic beaches and Japanese Zen...

June 19, 2019

The 'Unvoiced' group show, the first organised by TaintedGlory Art Blog, took place at the St Augustine Tower in London in June 2019. The Hackney-based show brought together 9 multi-disciplinary international artists. We would like to thank everyone who took part in the exhibition, visited us and helped us promote the event. 

 

The  installation of the show was initially a challenge, as we were using a listed building where no work could be hung directly on the walls. As a result all artists had to find inventive ways to display their 2D and 3D work. Our tribulations continued when the clumsy curator managed to get the venue keys stuck in the entrance door, the fire alarm decided to become possessed and the narrow, never-ending stairs of the tower turned everyone dizzy...But we would expect nothing else from this ancient , ghost-filled venue which is still home to several entombed bodies! 

 

 

We were also asked, after the private view opening, to remove some of the photographs displayed by Pedro Miguel Baeta and Claire Mariette as the venue felt they were not suitable for public viewing....Which in the end gave us all a good giggle and gave me a strange sense of satisfaction at being censored for my first curatorial effort!

 

You can see below images of the event, press features and information about the artists in the show. And now on to our next project...

 

FJ Jacquet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE ARTISTS

 

 

 

Pedro Miguel Baeta and Claire Mariette. Miguel is a London-based visual artist and graphic designer originally from Portugal. He worked in collaboration with his French partner Claire, also a designer, for the Unvoiced show. Their mixed-media pieces use a photograph substrate as a base. They address highly personal themes such as miscommunication and ego conflicts in highly emotional relationships.

 

 

 

 

Fabienne Jenny Jacquet. Fabienne is a British and French painter based in London. Her work is part of private and public collections across the world. She showed her new Beach series for the first time. The work turns  glorious, sun-bleached summer images into Gothic scenes.They are a combination of memories of a lonely childhood spent by the sea in France, her subsequent travels to California and of the turmoil caused by the recent death of her father and her own health issues. She is questioning her identity and sense of self but ultimately she is using her painting as a cathartic tool to get beyond loss and the past. 

 

Anna Kenneally. London-based artist Anna has recently been selected as a finalist for the Ashurst Emerging Artist Prize 2019.  Her paintings uncover the many faces of what it means to be an artist: from historic depictions of the tortured or suffering artist, to the more bohemian and romantic idea of creative people. Often reinventing existing subjects, the paintings form hybrids between the historical and the contemporary. The works in this show reflected the under-representation of women artists with the compositions redefining the female as maker rather than muse. 

 

Jennifer Smith. Jennifer is an Irish artist based in the Netherlands and she has exhibited extensively in both countries. The female nude is central to Jennifer’s work. Her main objective is to challenge how we look at the female body in contemporary society. Her paintings respond to a narrative influenced by social media, representations of the female body and perceptions of female beauty. We live in a world where women are still looked at and appreciated in terms of their body and beauty. The women in her paintings are rejecting the consumption of the gaze on their naked bodies. The figures in the paintings have no voices, some hide or have no face. Others turn away and hide from the gaze or defiantly challenging you to look at them in positions that have a sexual connotation. In no way are these women presented in a manner that seeks approval. However they challenge the viewer to interact and respond to how women are individually reclaiming the representation of their own bodies. 

 

Rachel Campbell. Rachel is a London-based artist whose work explores the blurred lines between nudes, sex and societal norms. She focuses on ideas of the male form, the female mind and how social and cultural constructs influence both.

 

Rosielea. Born and bred in Hackney in the 60’s, Rosielea has lived most of her life in New Zealand. Showing her work in Hackney feels like visiting her place of birth again, a place she left as an 11 year old. The pieces she showed were painted from personal clips and fragments of memory based on that time. The rough canvas the pieces are painted on reflect on what she describes as the ‘roughness’ of her childhood, what it was like to be a mostly defenceless girl child in a tough, and at times violent environment. Rosielea paints with mixed media and likes to experiment on different surfaces/substrates and finds great satisfaction in working with a variety of textures and mediums, exploring ways to best express ideas, feelings and observations Rosielea completed an art degree as a mature student  and now focuses on her art practice.

 

Noriko Watanabe. This London-based Japanese artist produces work that explores the line between painting and sculpture, East and West and the clash between human emotions and a world dominated by technology, individualism and superficiality. She has exhibited at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition on several occasions and her work is part of public and private collections in the UK and USA.

 

‘’In our contemporary society, loud voice, thick skin and aggression appear to be always winners of self- assertion. Representation by silence is often ignored.

Perhaps we are too busy or too tired to sense the subtlety of the unvoiced.

The deep sea hardly waves unlike the shallow sea.

Abundant richness of truth exists in the unvoiced or unseen.

Pause for a while and listen to the unvoiced, which leads to true dialogue.

That is a joy of life.’’

 

Chloe Wing. Chloe is a visual artist of Chinese origin based in the UK who makes light and shadow paper cutting installations. She hand-cuts everything to have a close, raw and expressive relationship to what she does. Chloe has an eclectic art background: she studied performance, music, children’s picture books, fashion and received an MFA in Fine Art from UAL. Her work is an idiosyncratic crossover which she describes as a ‘healing process’. She sees herself as a ‘humanitarian artist’ whose work is strongly psycho-social and focuses on social rules of thinking and behaviour in relation to aesthetics, beauty and patterns. She challenges social norms, especially those pertaining to women and how they should act in society.  Chloe is fascinated by how the things we see in everyday life have originated from past ideas, historical conventions, traditions and male authorities. Familiar forms of decoration can symbolise deeper and darker meanings, more than just the seemingly innocent and superficial appearance of things. Her work seeks to connect people and though it exhibits struggle and difficulty, underneath it all it is about catharsis, humanity and self-growth/ awareness. She is passionate about mental and emotional health because it is such an important and overlooked issue in today’s society. Exploration, self-nurture, conviction and intuition are what she wants to promote, in a world where we may seek too much outward approval.

PRESS

 

BEAST MAGAZINE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MADE IN SHOREDITCH MAGAZINE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JACKSON'S ART BLOG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MALL GALLERIES - STUDIO BLOG

 

 

 

 

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