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Women: States of Being, Melanie Furtado


In her sculptural series, Women: States of Being, Melanie Furtado gives us a much welcome alternative to the stale, one dimensional male gaze.


Furtado’s women, young and old, come in all shapes and sizes. They might be nude but this is not an exercise in seduction.


Instead, immersed in their own inward reality and stripped of their social status they give us a glimpse into their inner world and a piece of their soul.



Sculpting from life, Furtado says ‘’In this series, I am exploring quiet, personal moments as expressed through the bodies of modern, everyday women. The body’s physical form has an incredible ability to communicate on a very deep human level. Its simple position and expression can intimately reveal our internal state of being.’’


These bodies wobble, bend and sag. They show us their back, they ignore us, they don’t care whether we might like them or not. They are lost in their own thoughts, too busy being to bother about how they are seen. Their skin is not smooth, their blemishes are exposed, their bodies are flawed and they look both uncompromising and movingly human for it.


Furtado says ‘’I am inspired by the so-called imperfections of flesh. Each mark, wrinkle, and asymmetry is a physical archive of our lived experiences. I translate these forms using the earthy substance of clay, letting the final texture of the sculpture echo the surface of the skin.’’






A selection of seven sculptures from the series in progress are exhibited for Melanie Furtado’s Residency Finissage at Espace Jour et Nuit Culture in Paris, France.


These works were produced during her time at the artist residency program.
















Melanie Furtado is a sculptor who explores subtle emotional states through the contemporary figure. She lives and works on both the Westcoast of Canada and in Paris, France.


For more information about her Women: States of Being residency visit www.melaniefurtado.com/residency-exhibition








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